Definition of Active Parishioner
- Those members registered and attending Sunday (or Saturday vigil) Mass weekly at St. Mary as well as Holy Days of Obligation at St. Mary:
o This includes parents and children, no dropping off children by themselves for Mass.
o Holy Days of Obligation are:
 August 15 – The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
 November 1 – All Saints Day
 December 8 – Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary
 December 25 – Christmas
 January 1 – Mary, the Mother of God
o With the exception of traveling, but still must attend Mass where traveling.
o With the exception of sickness.
- Catholics who marry outside the Church or are divorced and re-married without a Decree of Declaration of Nullity from the Catholic Church of the previous marriage are unable to approach the Sacraments until their marital status is regularized in the Church. We are more than happy to help you in this process!  Please contact the priest for assistance with this.
- Those who contribute of their time, talent, and financial resources to support St. Mary.
o Three ways of tracking contributions are: written check, use of parish envelopes, or automatically online with Faith Direct.

In regard to Active Parishioner status:
- Catholic Tuition rate, Sacramental Preparation (Baptism, First Communion, Confirmation, and Holy Matrimony) will not be available to families who are not active parishioners.
- Families must be active parishioners for six months before Catholic Tuition rate and Sacramental Preparation (Baptism, First Communion, Confirmation, and Holy Matrimony) can begin.
- Sacramental Preparation classes must be faithfully attended. St. Mary reserves the right under canon law to delay reception of Sacraments due to lack of attendance at Sunday (or Saturday vigil) Mass, Sacramental preparation classes and/or a lack of desire and/or lack of understanding the nature of the Sacraments to be received.

"Holy Baptism is the basis of the whole Christian life, the gateway to life in the Spirit, and the door which gives access to the other sacraments. Through Baptism we are freed from sin and reborn as sons and daughters of God; we become members of Christ, are incorporated into the Church and made sharers in her mission…” Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC 1213)

Baptism of children before 7th birthday

Requirements for Parents:
- Must be active parishioners (see definition of active parishioner) for at least six months
- Must be married in the Church or beginning preparation process for marriage in the Church (convalidation).
- First time parents and new active parishioners (see definition of active parishioner) must attend a St. Mary Baptismal Seminar. This seminar is offered twice per year, please contact parish Director of Family Formation for more information.

Requirements for godparents:
- Only one godfather or one godmother or one of each.
- A Catholic who is at least 16 years old and has received the Sacrament of Confirmation and the Sacrament of the Eucharist and is an active parishioner of St. Mary or another Catholic parish (see definition of active parishioner). Godparents from other Catholic parishes must have their pastor fill out the St. Mary godparent affidavit, affix the parish seal, and return the affidavit to St. Mary for our records.
- Be a practicing Catholic who attends Mass weekly and receives the Sacraments regularly.
- Knows, understands and participates in the Catholic Church community.
- Help the baptized person to lead a Catholic Christian life in keeping with baptism and to fulfill faithfully the obligations inherent in it.
- A mature Catholic who will establish a lifelong faith relationship and be willing to walk with the child on their faith journey.
- A Catholic role model, mentor, and coach for the child.
- If the godparent is married, the marriage must be valid and recognized as a marriage in the Catholic Church.
- St. Mary must receive a newly issued Sacramental Certificate for the potential godparent listing all Sacraments (including marriage) received. These certificates are available at the parish in which the potential godparent was Baptized.
- The godparent cannot be the father or mother of the one to be baptized.
- Only with a Catholic godparent can a baptized, non-Catholic person serve as a Christian Witness of the Baptism.
- A Catholic who lacks the requirements to be a godparent of a Catholic who is now practicing a non-Catholic faith cannot serve as a Christian witness.

Baptism of children age 7 and older
- At age 7 and older children receive all three Sacraments of Initiation: Baptism, Confirmation, and Holy Eucharist together.
- Parents and child must be active parishioners (see definition of active parishioner).
- The child to be Baptized must be in the age appropriate Sacramental Preparation class for Holy Eucharist or Confirmation.
- The parents must be in classes for Christian Initiation themselves or be part of the parish’s Family Faith Formation program.
- For parents & godparents, the same guidelines for children under age 7 apply.

For Adults
Non-Baptized adults or Baptized but non-Catholic adults, please see Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults.

“Those who approach the sacrament of Penance obtain pardon from God's mercy for the offense committed against him, and are, at the same time, reconciled with the Church which they have wounded by their sins and which by charity, by example, and by prayer labors for their conversion." It is called the sacrament of conversion because it makes sacramentally present Jesus' call to conversion, the first step in returning to the Father from whom one has strayed by sin. It is called the sacrament of Penance, since it consecrates the Christian sinner's personal and ecclesial steps of conversion, penance, and satisfaction. It is called the sacrament of confession, since the disclosure or confession of sins to a priest is an essential element of this sacrament. In a profound sense it is also a "confession" - acknowledgment and praise - of the holiness of God and of his mercy toward sinful man. It is called the sacrament of forgiveness, since by the priest's sacramental absolution God grants the penitent "pardon and peace." It is called the sacrament of Reconciliation, because it imparts to the sinner the life of God who reconciles: "Be reconciled to God." He who lives by God's merciful love is ready to respond to the Lord's call: "Go; first be reconciled to your brother.”” Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC 1422-1424)

Who Can Approach The Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation?
- Children preparing for their First Holy Communion.
- Any Baptized Catholic who has venial or mortal sins to confess.
- One should never receive the Holy Eucharist in a state of mortal sin, please see Examination of Conscience below for more information.

Examination of Conscience for Adults and Teens

“I am the living bread which came down from heaven; if anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever; and the bread which I shall give for the life of the world is my flesh… So Jesus said to them, ‘Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in you; he who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day. For my flesh is food indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood, abides in me and I in him'” (John 6:51, 53-55).

First Holy Communion for Children
- In the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City preparation to receive the Sacrament of Holy Eucharist is a one year process of formation that begins when the child reaches the age of reason, generally around 2nd grade.
- Both parents and the child in formation must continually meet the definition of active parishioners of St. Mary (see definition of active parishioner).
- Only active families (see definition of active parishioner) of St. Mary may be in preparation for Holy Eucharist. The goal of our sacramental preparation at St. Mary is that our children not only interact in class with each other but also share in the life and worship of God in this parish on Sunday (or Saturday vigil). If your family is a member or attends another Catholic parish you must do First Communion preparation with that parish.
- In conjunction with formation classes, parents participate in educating their child for this celebration of the Sacrament by being part of Family Faith Formation.
- All the children prepared celebrate the Sacrament on the appointed days.
- It is required that children have this preparation and sufficient knowledge to understand the mystery of Christ. A child must demonstrate knowledge and understanding of what the Holy Eucharist is to be able to receive.
- Sacramental Preparation classes must be faithfully attended. Classes are held weekly and so only three classes per year may be missed. St. Mary reserves the right under canon law to delay reception of Sacraments due to lack of attendance at Sunday Mass (or Saturday vigil), at classes and/or a lack of desire and/or lack of understanding the nature of the Sacraments to be received.

Adult Baptized Catholics Who Missed First Holy Communion
- Must be an active parishioner (see definition of active parishioner).
- Must be part of Adult Faith Formation opportunities for nine months leading up to Holy Eucharist.

Adult Non-Catholics
- Must be an active parishioner (see definition of active parishioner).
- Must be part active part of Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults.

Who Is Unable To Receive The Holy Eucharist
- Non-Catholics
- Catholics who miss Sunday Mass and Holy Days of Obligation must make a Confession first before returning to the Holy Eucharist.
- Catholics who have been away from the Church must make a Confession first.
- Catholics who are conscious of mortal sin – See Sacrament of Penance (Confession) for more information on sin.

“Baptism, the Eucharist, and the sacrament of Confirmation together constitute the "sacraments of Christian initiation," whose unity must be safeguarded. It must be explained to the faithful that the reception of the sacrament of Confirmation is necessary for the completion of baptismal grace. For "by the sacrament of Confirmation, [the baptized] are more perfectly bound to the Church and are enriched with a special strength of the Holy Spirit. Hence they are, as true witnesses of Christ, more strictly obliged to spread and defend the faith by word and deed.” Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC 1285)

Children Under 18
- In the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City preparation to receive the Sacrament of Confirmation is a two year process of formation that begins in the fall of the child’s 9th grade year.
- Both parents and the child in formation must continually meet the definition of active parishioners of St. Mary (see definition of active parishioner).
- Only active families (see definition of active parishioner) of St. Mary may be in preparation for Confirmation. The goal of our sacramental preparation at St. Mary is that our children not only interact in class with each other but also share in the life and worship of God in this parish on Sunday (or Saturday vigil). If your family is a member or attends another Catholic parish you must do Confirmation preparation with that parish.
- Sacramental Preparation classes must be faithfully attended. Classes are held twice monthly and so only two classes per year may be missed. St. Mary reserves the right under canon law to delay reception of Sacraments due to lack of attendance at Sunday Mass (or Saturday vigil), at classes and/or a lack of desire and/or lack of understanding the nature of the Sacraments to be received.

Adult Baptized Catholics Who Missed Confirmation
- Must be an active parishioner (see definition of active parishioner).
- Must be part of Adult Faith Formation opportunities for nine months leading up to Confirmation.

Adult Non-Catholics
- Must be an active parishioner (see definition of active parishioner).
- Must be part active part of Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults.

Marriage is a “covenant or partnership of life between a man and woman, which is ordered to the well-being of the spouses and to the procreation and upbringing of children. When validly contracted between two baptized people, marriage is a sacrament.” Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC 1601).

For a marriage to take place at St. Mary:
- At least one of the couple must be an active parishioner (see definition of active parishioner).
- Must use parish organist. Use of a cantor is optional. All organist, cantor, and other musician fees must be paid in advance. (See fee chart for organist and cantor)
- Any additional musicians or cantors must be approved by pastor and organist and additional fees for working with said musicians or cantors must be paid in advance. (See fee chart for organist and cantor)
- Please do not book wedding reception venues ahead of scheduling the wedding with the Church. Scheduling of the wedding can only take place once the priest or deacon believes the couple understands the nature and obligations of marriage.
- The couple must be available to meet with the priest or deacon in person. The length and duration of meetings is dependent upon the couple’s understanding of the nature and obligations of marriage. During these meetings the priest/deacon and couple will:
o Complete the Pre-Nuptial Investigation to ensure there are no impediments to marriage.
o Explore the nature and obligations of marriage: life, fidelity, and openness to children.
o Take the FOCCUS Inventory online and schedule followup meetings with priest or deacon to go over areas of discussion.
o Meet with a certified Natural Family Planning instructor and be trained in the ways of family planning that are in accord with God plan for marriage and the Church’s teaching.
- St. Mary reserves the right under canon law to delay reception of Sacraments due to lack of attendance at classes and/or a lack of desire and/or lack of understanding the nature of the Sacraments to be received. If there is discerned to be an impediment to marriage or a lack of understanding of the nature and obligations of marriage a priest or deacon can delay the marriage so the impediment or lack of understanding can be repaired or removed.

“Holy Orders is the sacrament through which the mission entrusted by Christ to his apostles continues to be exercised in the Church until the end of time: thus it is the sacrament of apostolic ministry. It includes three degrees: episcopate, presbyterate, and diaconate. The word order in Roman antiquity designated an established civil body, especially a governing body. Ordinatio means incorporation into an ordo. In the Church there are established bodies which Tradition, not without a basis in Sacred Scripture, has since ancient times called taxeis (Greek) or ordines. And so the liturgy speaks of the ordo episcoporum, the ordo presbyterorum, the ordo diaconorum. Integration into one of these bodies in the Church was accomplished by a rite called ordinatio, a religious and liturgical act which was a consecration, a blessing or a sacrament. Today the word "ordination" is reserved for the sacramental act which integrates a man into the order of bishops, presbyters, or deacons, and goes beyond a simple election, designation, delegation, or institution by the community, for it confers a gift of the Holy Spirit that permits the exercise of a "sacred power" which can come only from Christ himself through his Church. Ordination is also called consecratio, for it is a setting apart and an investiture by Christ himself for his Church. The laying on of hands by the bishop, with the consecratory prayer, constitutes the visible sign of this ordination.” Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC 1536-1538)

For more information about priesthood, diaconate, or even consecrated religious life contact your priest or visit the website: https://www.okcvocations.com/

Anointing of the Sick is “one of the seven sacraments, also known as the ‘sacrament of the dying,’ administered by a priest to a baptized person who begins to be in danger of death because of illness or old age, through prayer and the anointing of the body with the oil of the sick. The proper effects of the sacrament include a special grace of healing and comfort to the Christian who is suffering the infirmities of serious illness or old age, and the forgiving of the person’s sins” Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC 1499, 1520, 1523, 1526-1532).

Often this Sacrament is misunderstood. It is to be used when:
- A baptized person begins to be in danger of death due to illness.
- A baptized person begins to be in danger of death due to old age.

A person who is to receive a surgical procedure such as colonoscopy, dental surgery, cosmetic surgery, or other medical tests does not fit the criteria of danger of death for the Anointing of the Sick. Many believe anesthesia from surgery is enough to receive Anointing of the Sick, but if there is no medical condition at the time of Anointing that brings someone to the point of danger of death, then the Sacrament of Anointing will not have its desired effect. In the case of someone who is to receive a medical procedure for a non-life threatening situation the appropriate Sacraments are Confession and Holy Communion.

For someone who has cancer, has had a heart attack, a stroke, or another condition that is currently causing them to be in danger of death please contact a priest as soon as possible for the Anointing of the Sick. It is customary that the priest administer the Sacrament of Anointing to a Catholic who is in a nursing home during his regular visits if they are in danger of death from a medical condition or come to be in danger of death from old age.